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Monthly Archives: June 2017

Information of Anti Stress Workouts

What we commonly know as “bad stress” – tension – is actually an instinctual, physiological reaction that enabled our prehistoric forefathers to survive the dangers of the wild.

When you perceive a danger or threat, your body assumes the well-known “fight or flight” mode that prepares you to defend yourself against attack. The hypothalamus region of the brain sends a message to the pituitary gland to secrete cortisol, “the stress hormone”, into your bloodstream. In the chain reaction that follows, signals begin rushing to all parts of your body. Adrenaline pours into your bloodstream, your heart beats faster, your blood pressure increases and your breathing gets heavy. You’re ready for action. Usually, though, the opportunity for physical release isn’t there; you merely sit and seethe. Though the stressful event may be over, the lack of reaction means that those chemicals remain in your bloodstream. Over a prolonged period, they can become overwhelming – even leading to high blood pressure, hypertension or a nervous breakdown.

Dr. Hans Selye, a pioneer in the study of stress and author of ‘Stress Without Distress’, explains that we have a three-step reaction to stress. First, we experience a stage of initial alarm. Followed by a stage of adaptation or resistance, and finally, we are exhausted. If we don’t move all the way through these stages, stress gets bottled up inside – a cumulative and insidious process.

Of course, exercise isn’t going to be any help at all if it only adds more stress to a tension-ridden life. So don’t create a situation where it means a rush-hour train journey to the gym, signing up for a class you won’t able to make, or spending more money than you can reasonably afford. But take heart, almost any regular muscle-moving activity, no matter how offbeat or humble, is stress-reducing. In fact, Selye goes so far as to call exercise “good stress.”

Joining the local football team, playing tennis at the club, and going out dancing are all great ways to blow off steam. The reason is that they incorporate aerobic exercise.

When you hear the word aerobic, don’t think only of tummy-tightening calisthenics in leotards. Any exercise is classified as aerobic if it increases your breathing rate without leaving you out of breath, and makes your heart and lungs work to supply more oxygenated blood to the muscles in action.

The best aerobic sports are swimming, bicycling, jogging, tennis and racquet-ball. Team sports that involve running, throwing and agility are good too (however, you can be somewhat more prone to injury). All of them will prove physically beneficial if you do them consistently, and they can offer just the tension-busting release you need to unwind, breathe deep and put things in perspective.

Pick an activity you enjoy and not one that’s going to make you even more stressed. Depending upon your level of fitness when beginning an aerobic exercise, walking may be the right exercise to meet your stress reduction needs. Consult your doctor when designing any anti-stress exercise regimen.

Those who work out regularly have expressed amazement at how the addition of an exercise programme into their daily routines can make a difference in their attitudes, their health and even their sex lives.

The human body wasn’t designed to sit at a desk; we were built to be movers and shakers in the physical, not the corporate sense. When you give your body the outlet it’s begging for, symptoms from listlessness to reduced sex drive to tension headaches often mysteriously disappear.

And you’ll learn to deal with stress better over time. Dr. Kenneth Cooper, founder of the Institute for Aerobics Research in Dallas observes: “Aerobically fit people actually have lower heart rates during stressful situations than people who aren’t fit.”

Follow these general stress reduction guidelines:

Work out hard enough but not too hard. When you perform aerobic exercises, your goal should be to get the heart pumping to 70 per cent of its maximum capacity. Once you’ve hit this point, you should maintain it for about 20 minutes. A good rule of thumb for determining how hard you should do an aerobic exercise is that you should be able to hold a conversation at the same time.

Also, pick a place to do it that makes you comfortable. Try to schedule your workout at a convenient time, and stick to it. Nothing will make you more tense than feeling obligated instead of inspired to get your body moving.

And don’t expect too much at once. Remember, as with all activities, you only get out as much as you put in.

About Rowing Machine

Let’s dive deep

There are four types of rowing machines. They are:

  • Air
  • Magnetic
  • Water/fluid
  • Hydraulic piston machines

Incomplete knowledge is dangerous

Air rowers are caught on among the determined rowers who practice unseasonably. The spinning flywheel of the rower provides resistance, which in turn creates wind when the handle is pulled. They are adjustable, the resistance can be adjusted whenever you want. But these are machines that can be noisy. Hydraulic piston machines are nowadays out of fashion. They leak, can have dead spots, are unreliable and cost you high maintenance charges. The high resistance and time-consuming solutions are the reasons for them to be outdated. Besides this, they cost you cheap. It is advisable to not use air rovers and hydraulic piston machines if you live in a flat and want to avoid raising the roof of your neighbors.

The magnetic and water rovers are a good choice but can cost you an arm and a leg. You can afford them with a high budget. Water rovers are the latest in trends, larger in size and uses water and paddles for resistance and smooth action. The maintenance cost is low and the inharmonious sounds can be refrained. Magnetic rowers are most popular and a better option to workout at home. Their small size and little maintenance are the reasons for its popularity.

Making a good choice

One should not waste good mistakes by not learning from them. If you buy the inappropriate thing, it can result into an expensive mistake. Look out for these features before opening your wallet.

It should be a resistance type. Magnetic and Air rovers are best examples of this type. The rest are likely to leak.

The seat-rail, length is one of the main points of concern if you are tall. Select one with smooth metal-alloy rail.

The metal foot plates should be made of metal and not plastic.

Avoid using chain systems as they produce sounds which can be harsh on the ear. Instead, a belt system does the work for you.

The computer console should display your workout details and be automatic with manual override for the resistance.

Perspectives

There are different products on sale ranging in price, size, quality and results. People usually compromise on quality for price. One can have different outlooks towards a same thing, but there is always a good choice and bad choices. It is based on many factors like the features of the product, quality, reliability and efficiency.

The prices can vary widely. Those costing less than $500 are very basic with no console while those ranging between $500 and $1000 are standard rovers with a sheer console. The higher priced ones last longer while cheaper ones need frequent servicing. The excellent rovers range between $1000 to $2000 while the premium ones cost you more than $2000. Some people prefer the cheap ones for temporary use where the money can be recovered by selling, while others buy for long time use. Different sizes are designed for different floorings and heavyweight users.

Get A Flatter Stomach

A majority of people that have a pot belly also have some pretty unhealthy eating habits. The old adage that abs start in the kitchen is surprisingly true. Those that eat more processed foods and sweets are more likely to gain weight in the mid-section than those that keep up a healthy diet of lean meats and the proper number of carbs.

To combat sugar cravings, leaders in the personal training field recommend eating a handful of fruit instead, and not buying junk food at the store. If it is not in the house, most people will not eat it. Instead of driving all the way to the store to get something sweet or salty when the urge hits, people will stick to what is readily available.

Sticking to a meal plan is another great option for people that are overweight. A specialist in the personal training field or a nutritionist can help those that want a flatter stomach create an individualised meal plan that works for their lifestyle.

While sit ups are a great start, the key in losing area around the stomach lies in including a variety of exercises. Sit ups will only target a specific area, and they do not target every single muscle in the middle area. Including different workouts in the workout routine can help every person see the results that they want.

This can also help to prevent people from getting bored to quickly. A combination of different routines and including something that does not involve the same equipment every day, such as a yoga class, can help keep people interested and give them the ability to reach their goals. Personal training can involve a variety of things, and these experts can help tell the best things to do outside of the gym to get a fit body with a flat stomach.

Those in the personal training industry see too many people give up too quickly. It is vital to remember that to see the results desired, working out and reaching those fitness goals needs to be a priority. Those that are consistent in their efforts to lose weight in their stomach will see better results than those that only exercise sporadically.

This is another thing that causes many people to give up quickly. Often, when a few weeks go by and the results are small, people get discouraged, lose patience and then quit all together. It’s important to know that everyone loses weight differently, and this is often caused by genetics. Exercising causes the entire body to burn calories, and then it is up to the body as to where those calories come from. For one person, this may be the arms first, and for another it may be the stomach.

If the body is losing weight anywhere, those same results will eventually be applied to the stomach. It simply takes consistency and patience to see those results happen. Because of this, some people are encouraged to focus more on being healthy instead of how many inches they have lost around their waist. When you remove the constant concern about the size of the stomach, it is impossible to get impatient because it is not smaller.

Total Body Fitness

# Feel Good. Exercise makes you feel good, both physically and mentally. It gives you a psychological lift and strengthens your sense of accomplishment. The discipline associated with exercise also makes you feel good about yourself: “I feel good that I walked today,” or “When I run, I feel I have control over one area of my life.”

# Look Good. Regular exercise plays an important role in helping to reduce body fat and weight and to develop muscle. Fitness can give you a better-looking, better-proportioned body: a flatter abdomen, firmer thighs, and slimmer hips.

# Feel Younger. Increasing your activity level can reverse or slow the changes that many people think are simply the unavoidable results of aging. In reality, lack of exercise usually reduces flexibility, strength, blood vessel elasticity, and lung functions; slows reaction time and metabolism; and increases body fat between ages 30 and 60.

# Build A Stronger Heart. Regular exercise may help reduce or modify some of the risk factors associated with heart disease, such as high cholesterol levels, elevated blood pressure, obesity, and stress. A three-year study at the University of Toronto showed that people who exercised regularly after a heart attack had less than a 5 per cent chance of having a second attack, while those who were sedentary had 22 per cent chance.

WHAT IS PHYSICAL FITNESS?

Physical fitness has two extremes: the well-conditioned person at one end and the completely inactive individual at the other. To be well-conditioned, you need to work on the four components of physical fitness: Body Composition, Cardiovascular Fitness, Muscle Fitness, and Flexibility.

# Body Composition: Body composition is the ratio between body fat and muscle. Too much fat and not enough muscle may increase your risk of heart disease, diabetes, gout, and arthritis and back problems.

# Cardiovascular Fitness: Cardiovascular fitness is the ability of the heart, blood, and blood vessels to transport oxygen to your muscles. A strong, efficient heart is important for stamina and may lower your risk of heart disease.

# Muscle Fitness: Muscle fitness is the strength, endurance and shape of your muscles. Good muscle fitness helps you maintain good posture; avoid lower back pain; and lift, carry, push, and press any objects. Regular exercise keeps your muscles well developed – an important ingredient in proper body composition. Calisthenic and weight-training exercises improve your muscle fitness. Aerobic exercises also can improve muscle fitness, although to a lesser extent.

# Flexibility: Flexibility is the range of motion possible at the joints of your body. Good flexibility helps you avoid lower back pain, plus joint, neck, shoulder, arm and leg injuries. Calisthenics, stretching exercises and yoga can help maintain or improve flexibility or suppleness.

GETTING OFF TO A GOOD START

Before you begin an exercise programme, discuss what you plan to do with your physician. Most physicians will adjust the programme according to your needs and health status.

HOW FIT ARE YOU NOW?

Evaluate your physical fitness level before you start a fitness programme. Ask yourself the following questions for the evaluation:

CARDIOVASCULAR FITNESS

Q #1: Do you exert yourself enough to work up a sweat for 20 minutes or more, three to four times a week?

Q #2: Are you physically active on the job? That is, does your work require you to move for at least 40 minutes non-stop, do vigorous physical activity, lift heavy objects?

BODY COMPOSITION

Q #3: Is your weight appropriate to standard height/weight charts?

Q #4: Are you satisfied with your body’s muscle tone and the way your body looks?

MUSCLE FITNESS

Q #5: Have you been free of lower back pain (backache) during the past 6 months?

Q #6: Have your waistline expanded less than one inch since age 18 (women) or 21 (men)?

FLEXIBILITY

Q #7: Can you easily touch your toes without bending your knees?

Q #8: Are you currently free from aches, pains or stiffness in joints such as neck, shoulders, lower back, hips, and knees?

WHAT IS YOUR BODY TYPE?

In addition to your medical and fitness status, consider your weight and body type when starting a fitness programme.

BODY TYPES

Heavy: Substantial amount of fat with poor muscle development – usually very inactive.

Heavy Muscular: Substantial amount of fat with fair to good muscle development – usually formerly or occasionally active.

Thin: Very lean and very little muscle development – usually very inactive.

Now check the list below for guidelines on the best exercises for particular body types. But remember that there are always exceptions: some aerobic dancers are heavy and muscular, and some swimmers are thin. In general, the list highlights those activities from which you can expect the most success, the least frustration, and the best chance to staying with on the road to fitness. For example, a heavy person may not get the full benefit of jumping rope, running, or aerobics because of the stress that extra body fat puts on the legs.

# Heavy: Bicycling; Swimming; Brisk Walking

# Heavy Muscular: Aerobic Dancing; Bicycling; Racquet Sports; Swimming; Brisk Walking; Weight Training.

# Muscular: Aerobic Dancing; Bicycling; Racquet Sports; Jumping Rope; Running/Jogging; Climbing Stairs; Swimming; Brisk Walking; Weight Training.

# Thin Muscular: Aerobic Dancing; Bicycling; Racquet Sports; Jumping Rope; Running/Jogging; Climbing Stairs; Swimming; Brisk Walking; Weight Training.

# Thin: Aerobic Dancing; Jumping Rope; Running/Jogging; Climbing Stairs; Brisk Walking

ASSESS YOUR PERSONALITY

Your personality is basic to success in selecting the right fitness programme. If you are introverted, you will probably like activities that you can do alone such as bicycling, running, and swimming. If you like to do things with other people, an aerobics class, racquet sports, walking with a friend or perhaps weight training at a gym may be best. If you are competitive, one of the racquet sports may be a consideration. As an outdoor person, brisk walking, jogging, or roller skating might be one of your options.

CHOOSE A FITNESS ACTIVITY

There are many activities that help you get into shape. Brisk walking, running/jogging, swimming, bicycling, aerobics, jumping rope, climbing stairs, weight training, and racquet sports will all help you develop physical fitness. These activities very, however, in how effectively they help you develop the four fitness components.

To make the most of the activity you choose, it’s important to consider how often, how vigorously, and how long you exercise.

FREQUENCY, INTENSITY AND TIME

FREQUENCY

You need to exercise three to four days each week. While some people exercise every day, it’s good idea to take a day or two of rest, especially if you have been inactive for some time. If you are past age 40, exercising every other day gives your body time to recover.

INTENSITY

You have an efficient, built-in computer for determining how hard to exercise: your heart or pulse rate. To count your pulse rate, place your first and second fingers of one hand along the thumb side of your other wrist to feel for the pulse. Count pulse for 10 seconds, then multiply by 6 to find out how many times your heart beats per minute.

Your ideal exercise level is determined by your “training heart rate.” Your training heart is approximately 60 to 85 per cent of your maximum heart rate. To make sure you are exercising vigorously enough; check your pulse occasionally to see if your heart rate falls within the training zone.

In addition to taking your pulse rate, you can determine whether you are exercising too hard by listening to your body. For example, if your breathing is laboured, slow down. A good guide is that you should be able to hold a conversation while exercising.

The list below shows average ranges; you should check with your doctor if you have a condition that would not allow you to safely reach these levels.

TRAINING HEART RATE:

Age || Beats per Min.

10-19: 123-174

20-29: 117-166

30-39: 111-157

40-49: 104-149

50-59: 99-140

60-69: 93-132

70+: 87-123

When considering the intensity of exercise, remember your fitness level and age. If you are just beginning a programme, exercise on the low side of your training heart rate. This is, do not exceed 10 beats above your lower reading. For a 40-year-old, for example, a pulse rate of 105-115 could be appropriate.

A warning: trying to beat the clock can defeat an otherwise good exercise programme. Thinking that if two miles in 17 minutes is good, then two miles in 15 minutes is better can be inefficient. When you run, bike, swim, or walk against the clock as if trying to excel in competition, you have moved from fitness to sport.